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Revised 02/08/2016

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CAUX

[CAUX401] Walter de Caux m. ?
. [CAUX411] Robert I de Caux m2. Basilia de Normanville
. . [CAUX421] Walter de Caux m. Anneis
. . . [CAUX431] Lord Robert II de Caux of Laxton m. [DERB374] Isabel of Derby
. . . . [CAUX442] Matilda de Caux of Laxton m. [BIRK441] Adam FitzPeter de Birkin

[CAUX401] Walter de Caux (born c.1021).

[CAUX411] Robert I de Caux (born c.1046) married 1.  Amicia (previously married to Geoffrey Alselin); then 2. [NORV412] Basilia or Gasilea (daughter of [NORV401] Ralf de Normanville, son of [NORV391] Gerard de Normanville).

[CAUX421] Walter ([born c.1075], son of Robert & Gasilea) married Anneis.

[CAUX431] Robert II de Caux (born c.1106), feudal Lord of Laxton (Notts), hereditary warden of the Forests of Derbyshire & Nottinghamshire, married [DERB374] Isabel de Ferrieres (daughter of Earl Robert, see DERBY (FERRIERES) EARLDOM).

[CAUX442] Matilda (daughter of Robert) married [BIRK441] Adam FitzPeter (see BIRKIN).

[CAUX441] Robert III de Caux ([born c.1135], son of Robert II) married Sybil de Basset (born c.1135, daughter of Richard de Basset DRAYTON BARONY). Their family home was at Brampton [Old Brampton today], Derbyshire.

[CAUX452] Matilda de Caux (daughter & sole heir of Robert III) married Ralph FitzStephen, one time Chancellor to King Henry II (and quite possibly Henry's second-cousin, an illegitimate son of King Stephen, by Dameta, a gentlewoman of Normandy). After Ralph died (25th July 1202), Matilda took over the Barony of Caux, and became Chief Forester of Sherwood Forest. She died 1223-24, without issue, and her heir was her first-cousin John de Birkin (see BIRKIN).

Matilda was buried at Brampton (Derbyshire), in what is today the Parish Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Old Brampton.

Extracted from "A fresh look at Old Brampton Church" (Stephen Knight, 1996): Digging out a new grave one day early in the 18th Century, the sexton struck something hard with his spade. It proved to be the magnificent stone grave slab of Matilda le Caus, now on the west wall of the nave, beside the arch into the tower. ... Only a little battered by the centuries, the slab is finely carved and full of dignity. Part of it had been cut away like a window to reveal Matilda's head and shoulders. Her parted hair and head-dress are beautifully carved and she holds her heart in her hands. Her feet appear at the bottom of the slab and in between is a magnificently lettered inscription.

HIC:IACET:MATILDA

LE:CAUS:ORATE:

PRO:ANIMA EI' :PAT' NOS'

 

Close-up of her head, and her hands holding her heart:

After almost 800 years, Matilda's name can be clearly discerned:

 
 

(Photographs taken 2 June 2007)