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Revised 09/09/2016

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PICTISH STONES

(and other early stones)

There are numerous Pictish stones, which have survived for over a thousand years. These include:

 
Elgin Elgin

Dunblane

  Dunblane

 
(rear view)
 
(front view)

(front view)
(9th C)

 (rear view)

 
(5 March 2005)  

(3 September 2002)

   

 

SUENO'S STONE

Located at Forres is Sueno's Stone, the largest known Pictish sculptured stone. The style suggests it was carved around the 9th/10th century, providing three possibilities:

1. It commemorates the Scots under King Kenneth I MacAlpin beating the Picts in the mid-9th Century;

2. It commemorates a confrontation between local forces and Norseman, late9th/early 10th Century;

3. It refers to the conflict at Forres (966) when King Dubh (son of King Malcolm I) was killed by the men of Moray, after which battle his body lay for a while beneath the bridge at nearby Kinloss, before being taken to Iona for burial.

      Sueno's Stone
              Forres
         (part of detail)
         (5 March 2005)

 

                                   JEDBURGH ABBEY

This 8th-10th Century carving depicts
Christ in Majesty
appearing before a
multitude of dead and
tormented souls, and
referred to as the
Domesday Stone.
Discovered during excavations
in 1984

Jedburgh Abbey
(24 September 2002)

Jedburgh Abbey
(19 September 2004)

 

ST. ANDREW'S CATHEDRAL

There is a large collection of early stones, complete and fragments, at this ancient cathedral.

St. Andrew's Cathedral
(24 July 2006)

sarcophagus
 

Celtic cross
 

sculptured stones
 

PICTISH STONES AT ROSS-SHIRE CHURCHES

 
  Edderton Church-yard
(1 September 2016)
Nigg Church inside
(1 September 2016)